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, actually my first attempt to use photoshop took a picture of george washington, john adams and start them altogether and that was the founders signed monster, the great collective founding fathers opinion. the rhetorical effect to finance depends on the unanimity. if you say some founders believe x, some believe why and hear barack obama is talking about why you not ask. rush's statement dominus entering a nonhistorical conversation when he said the founding fathers believe x. barack obama believes why becomes a state. so at a very fundamental level, the discourse imus on me to can't draw that distinction between the founders believed in those founders believed for some founders believed because that historically incoherent unanimity is fundamental to the way. >> host: is there any hope of propagandists to have a meaningful, construct a conversation about the founding fathers? >> guest: i think that's at odds with what most propagandists are trying to do. >> host: let me ask about the founding fathers apart from an author says that about them. was this a special group of people? maybe the
, but it got your. abigail adams was in the crowd in the intersection and wrote to her husband, john, and said, it was crazy. after the declaration was read. everything british was ripped down and burned in the middle of the intersection immediately after the reading, including the unicorn that flank the eastside that was put up in 1881. but immediately it was one of the first few things that was ripped off the symbols of british authority and burned in the middle of the intersection. so a little rambunctious. in boston. it continued to be, but before that in 1770 come on march 5, the boston massacre happened just outside the intersection as well. something we're very all familiar with and something that bob allison contributed to in the book as well as his own book on that. but another rambunctious event in the city of boston. so just right outside this building itself. now we're going to turn to a panel discussion, which will be in the fashion of question and answer session. this mic in the middle of the aisle here is for you to step up to after questions to the panel. right now going to int
about the archives. john said it and it's true. people like me who want to research american history are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i and my research assistants, including josh israel, who is up there someplace and is going to give us some entertainment with johnson and king talking, could not possibly have gotten as far as we got in trying to unravel this story. without the resources of the archives and the unfailingly courteous, bright, helpful people from the archives. i want to personally thank them not only on behalf of myself but in behalf of other people who work in this field. they are just great. the idea of this book was sort of a gamble. it was a hunch. i wondered -- there have been lots of books written about king. there have been lots of books written about johnson. there have been lots of books written about civil rights, but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day by day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from the kennedy's assassination to the p
of john so sunu. not the chief of staff but i think it's fair to say i'm the only person turned to a career of poetry by john. george h. w. bush presidency was sort of a gray time for those of us in the small joke trade. very bland group of people. i always refer to them as at nice protestant gentleman in constitutes. -- suits. they all sort of looked like. the only person that stood out was john who wasn't in shape like the rest of them. [laughter] also, he had that characteristic that draws the attention of people like me. and that is he was very interested in proving that he was the smartest comby in the room. -- go in the room. that samed to be -- seemed to be his main aim in life. and ed roll lynns, the political campaign manager once said that john is an argument against telling your child that he has a high iq. [laughter] and he that beautiful name sunu. i love that name. we use to murmur that name on the new york subway. and eventually i wrote a poem called "if you knew what sunu." [laughter] i sent the poem to the editor of the "nation" i had done a column. until i swit
interviewed professor john l. jackson jr. about his book racial paranoia. the interview was conducted at the university of pennsylvania annenberg school of communication. .. is. >> i argue when you think about a country like united states trying to work after its own history of racial antagonism, 1 mile is we transcend to build a multiracial community but posters reality by oppression hopefully we will move beyond it. but they both fall under that umbrella. >> host: go to the second example of a ignoring race. why it's important? >> it is important not to make a fetish but not to discuss it means it is already in the room but we have to be careful that is the historical position we have been through this but now to move forward to pretend we have not run this are already? to know what we want the community to become the look of the differences that divide us. it is a fine ninth to make too much or make a fetish are everyone could have a vested interest. >> host: professor jackson what is the role of political correctness? at. >> guest: it is easy to take the pot shot but it tries to p
to sort of talk a -- at 1940, i'm sorry 1820. he writes a letter to john adams and he says our duty as americans is teen neologism he creates the word. jefferson him is creating all these words and some of them -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire but for the footstool. there are 114 words now and the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson as a corner or the introducer and the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. i'm sorry. mona craddock meaning a person who is in a single room. the one that he does the most with and becomes the most egregious with the purest and the language police is the word be little. he creates the word be little and he knows he is creating something that is going to be very disturbing and noah webster himself just loves the word. in fact he wanted to know webster's teachers at yale who writes noah webster about the word be little and the british hate the word when fowler comes up with modern english usage in 1938 in the first edition. fowler is still
-- no. i want to add one more thing about the archives. john said it, and it's true. people like me, who want to research american history, are incredibly dependent on the resources of the national archives. i, and my research assistants, including josh israel, who is up there someplace and is going to give us some entertainment with johnson and king talking. could not possibly have gotten as far as we got in trying to unravel the story without the resources of the archives and the unfailingly courteous, bright, helpful people from the archives. and i want to personally thank them, not only in behalf of myself but in behalf of other people who work in this field. they're just great. the idea of this book was sort of a gamble. it was a hunch. i wondered -- there have been lots of books written about king. lots of books written about johnson. there's been lots of books written about civil rights. but no one had taken johnson and king together, put them under a microscope, and watched what they did day-by-day through an incredible period of history. a two-year period, from kennedy's assassi
at the british with words. write a letter to john adams and says, our duty as americans -- he creates the word meola jives and jefferson is creating all these words. he created ottoman for the footstool. jefferson was the coiner or introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream and the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his world. mono crowd is his word. the one that he does the most weight and becomes the most egregious is the word belittled. he creates the word a little. he knows what he's up to and he knows he's creating something is going to be very disturbing. noah webster loves the word and one of his teachers at yale writes in a letter about the word. the british hate the word to the extent that one scholar comes out with modern english usage, the first edition, dollar is still attacking the word it creates a sort of disturbed approach to the british. one of webster's presets was that the american language be descriptive other than prescriptive. it would not be dictated by a single authority. it would be the language of the trapper and farmer and trade
adams was such a remarkable revolutionary leader, and so is his cousin, john. >> yes. >> could you tell us a bit about the different styles of leadership and their different approaches to the issues of the day, how they thought the movement should go forward towards independence? thanks. >> well, the truth is it was a little easier for john adams, because of what sam adams had done before him. and sam adams had been called by a number of people the actual father of the country because he was the chief spokesperson, and policymaker for the sons of liberty. the sons of liberty separate cells really of radical people, opposed to the british, certain, finally a revolution was necessary. that sprung up almost independently across the colonies in connecticut, in new york, in pennsylvania, in south carolina. and sam adams became the chief letter writer, the political strategist and stories told of a neighborhood walk by his house at 2:00 in the morning and he would see the light in the sands of study out there, and now that his pen was going to scribble -- trying to lead us towards independenc
'm sorry, 1820, he writes a letter to john adams, and he says, you know, our duty as americans is to neologize, to create new phrases. so jefferson creating all these words, and some of them are -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire, but for the foot stool. he creates -- there's just, there are 114 words now in the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson either as the coiner or the introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. and the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. pussy -- i'm sorry, that's teddy roosevelt. monocrat meaning a person who believes in a single rule. the one he does probably the most with and becomes the most egregious to the purists and the language police is the word "belittle." he creates the word belittle, he knows what he's up to. he knows he's creating something that's going to be very disturbing. noah webster himself loves the word. in fact, one of noah webster's teachers at yale writes noah webster a letter about the word "belittle," and it extends -- the british hate the wor
, which is in my own state, st. john's parish, and the damage inflicted in st. john didn't make headlines as did sandy, but there were thousands of people who lost their businesses, lost their homes, and we're spending all kinds of money. st. john's parish, one small parish in the midst of the devastation, has spent $12 million on debris removal. 12 million. now, that is predictable. we know it's going to happen and the army corps is moving to figure out a way to mitigate. how to prevent doing this again. i'm told they need a million dollars of federal money to finish the study and begin the authorization process. that's part of what we have committed to in the congress. instead, next time there's a big event, there will be 12 million more in debris removal. it's just crazy. so, again, this is not an earmark for south louisiana. it doesn't instruct the corps to spend one dollar. all it does is give the corps the able to say, listen, we got all this money in sandy, frankly, there's no place to spend it we think is worth it, and if that's the case, if we can spend a small portion someplace
. john's scott king desert rose in the life and legacy of coretta space king. she talks with books of america the publishers' trade show. this is about half an hour. >> bernice, who was scott bagley? >> well the sister of coretta scott king. >> and your mother. >> yes, my mother, so my aunt. he and my mother grew up in alabama together obviously and she later became a john notte professor. she founded the university in pennsylvania. so, a very lively woman. and unfortunately passed last year in june after completing the book. >> so this book is desert rose, the life and legacy of coretta scott king and the author is your aunt. when did she write this book? >> welcome it was a journey that began with my mother's request to write her story. at that time both of my parents were constantly being threatened she was confirmed she wouldn't be lost and wanted people to know she wasn't just the life of martin luther king jr. and mother of children but the role in the movement and very much an activist before she met martin luther king so from that angle as well as wanting to tell the story
and is john fonte, author "sovereignty or submission" about global covering america's constitutional democracy. during the dinner, mr. fonte delivered a lecture based on his book. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you. i'm very honored and it's very flattering to be in such good company of the previous winners of the paolucci/bagehot award. it's an honor to receive this, an organization, which for more than 60 years has done wonderful work insisting in the core principles of american civic life. i also wish to extend condolences to the isv community for the recent loss of a great lady and a great scholar, and gallucci. at least to acknowledge gallucci gallucci -- i hope that he would've been pleased at presenting this award to me, as pleased as i am in receiving it. i'm going to proceed as follows. first i'm going to talk about what i call philadelphia sovereignty. second i'm going to examine the ideas of the global governance project, which challenges philadelphia sovereignty. and then we'll move to action and look at the actual activities. fourth, will examine the significance
you and i with a book about john updike. and the novelistic essay is what you get thrown out the works of the really great polish writer and of course, we value him for his reporting for the fact he witnessed all of those revelations in south america but that those essays about anything and everything. may interesting case of this framing lecture. christmas morning mentioned the book but they're really did not make any difference because for so long they were indifferent to our telex such pride in and what has emerged from after his death to roam the world as he did with the secret service and not to go into the conundrum but from the point* of view was severely compromised by the revelation also the issue about whether he saw some of the events that he provided such a spill of blinding eye witness accounts. but to repeat with that wonderful digressions from the shadow of the sun and continuing on the note of novelistic essay behalf to mention the huge book on yugoslavia, here she is in a cafe in the 1930's. this is her in yugoslavia. and seems so much from gabrielle. officers moved rh
of 60, marvelously having tired of john quinn of new york and all the letters, she burned his letters immediately, he kept her and when he died, in the public library, very close to the letters edith wharton wrote in her 40s, one of the most powerful people at that time in the world's, love letters' all responding to be punished by morgan fuller 10 and asking please burn them because she kept them too. i think there's a very big difference if you write a biography of a woman born before the 20th century and the best example of that is alice james and jean strauss's biography, attempting to piece together a life where we have the clues from court, her brother william and her brother henry and from her letters and diaries, trying to work out 15 or 16, james got into bed basically and suffered and died in her 40s and did not do the work her brothers received, seeming to have the biting wit that both laughed to some extent, a bit of prose style in either of them and a sharper mind, the only girl in the family of five sitting at a dinner table, listening to them, one of them to a stirring
of 60 marvelously having tired of john quinn in new york. she burned his letters immediately. he kept hers and they are in the public library to be red. very close to the letters that she wrote in her 40s. one of the most powerful pieces in the world at that time. the girlish love letters, always wanted to be punished by morton fullerton. please burn them but he kept them. so i think there is a very big difference if you write a biography of a woman worn before the 20th century. i think the best example of that is -- and jean strouse' biography tempting to piece together the life and we have the clues from of course her brother william, her brother henry and from her letters and from her diaries trying to work out that he died in her 40s and did not produce the work that her brothers produced but had the abiding wish that lacked a bit of prose style than either of them in a better mind -- a sharper mind than either of them. the only girl in the family of five sitting at the dinner table listening to them until a certain age when her mother made clear to her it's your job to start
-town in south africa. c-span: and john lewis. >> guest: john lewis, young man grew up stuttering, preaching to chickens in rural alabama, went to college in ashbel, became a screen writer on one of the shock troops and the most devoted of king's followers on the students and is now a congressman from -- she's my mom and dad's, from the fifth district of atlanta. c-span: james bevel. >> guest: james bevel, john the baptist of the -- front of the john lewis' out of the national movement with his wife die and who was kind of face to all bones of the freedom rides coo kids in their early 20s to lead the freedom rides, then went on to recommend the use of children when the birmingham movement was suffocated. and later in testament the children who were bombed in birmingham in 1963, they really devised as their response to the bombing what became the selma voting rights movement to win the right to vote for minorities across the south. c-span. wachtel. >> guest: harry wachtel, dr. king's lawyer, one of the early corporate and merger lawyers in new york city whose conscience stirred him because hi
communication. it is about 25 minutes. >> host: john l. jackson is a director of africanus teddies at the university of pennsylvania. he's the author most recently of this book, racial paranoia, the unintended consequences of political correctness. dr. jackson, when you talk about racial paranoia, who is paranoid? >> guest: i would argue we are all paranoid when it comes to race and probably for good reason. one of the points in the book is that raises a category itself is about the embedding of paranoia into the way they look a social life. for instance, the whole point is to say some distances are so paramount, biological, hardwired that we have to be on the lookout at all times and mixing of different ways in which we differentiate between us and them. greece itself is about fearing social paranoia. when you think about a country like the united states that's trying to work through its own history of racial antagonist and coming to have two models. one is we're transcending them in moving beyond, trying to build a multiracial community. .. the only reason why i feel like we have
john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has already criticized the u.k. coalition government from backing away from his original proposal while the european commission's recent report summarizing the responses received to the likennen report acknowledges the widespread opposition to the proposal in a charmingly understated fashion, stating: in general banks welcome the group's analysis but argue that a compelling case for mandatory separation of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt the proposal wasn't backed by the required evidence and that there was a need for a thorough impact assessment. with all due respect to my friends in the european financial regulatory community, when a regulatory proposal is viewed within the e.u. as being too harsh on a financial industry and harmful to markets, i think it's a clear sign that it's time to take a step back and reevaluate. regardless of what happens with respect to the vickers or likennen proposals, even if all of the most vitriolic allegations wall street's harshest critics set forth are true, even if our finan
including douglas brinkley, and congressman john lewis. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your air and we will add them to our list. post on her wall at facebook.com/booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >> for the next three hours booktv brings your a few panels and other presentations from the 2013 key west literary seminar in florida. first we hear from paul hendrickson, author of hemingway's -- "hemingway's boat". >> good morning, good morning, thank you. i moved up my flight, then go to the airport after, literally right after i spend ten minutes here reading and i am going to read something quite short on the theory that less is more which i try to tell my writing students. speaking of them, one of the reasons, hurtling back to philadelphia, i have to hold office hours with the lovely the 0 ivy brats. i bet get home and sleep well all the we haven't slept wilson's the jimmy carter administration. thank you, you holding up is the key. i bet i won't even have time to formally say thank you and goodbye. i will the say to miles how eloquent his little segway intro
that much appreciated and it's an honor to be introduced by my class late -- classmate john henry. john is the -- most of john's ancestors were prominent virginians during the period of the colonies but were mostly anti-crown so i asked asked john why is at it that patrick henry was the most outspoken? and his answer was incredibly -- richard it's because he was for. however poor he may have been patrick henry was a very rich warrior and one of his greatest features he said in the quote different and often see the same subject in different lights and therefore i hope it will not be disrespectful to those gentlemen if entertaining opinions of a character opposite to theirs and i shall speak forth my time is freely and without reserve. this is no time for ceremony. it's an awful moment for our country. patrick henry was addressing the repression of the american colonies by the british crown and tonight i wish to speak to a different kind of repression, the injustice of being held hostage by large financial institutions considered too big to fail or by the acronym tbt of. and unfair tax
also to john adams. i'm going to try to make it. [applause] .. this service or that service. when you come here and see what's possible for example we were able to cd enabled chip that could allow you to have 300 megabits per second of the data that would allow you to watch each dtv on a wireless device very easily. >>> author of numerous books on abraham lincoln recalls the four months between president lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to we
'll have it live for you here on c-span2. yesterday and today johns hopkins university in baltimore has been hosting a summit on reducing gun violence. speakers have included new york city mayor michael bloomberg and maryland governor martin o'malley. this afternoon at 4 eastern they will hold a news conference to release their recommendations for stemming gun violence. we'll have live coverage here on c-span2. again, that will be at 4 p.m. eastern. >>> and right around this time to have year every year governors address their state legislatures on the state of their states. laying out the priorities for the new year. tonight at 7:30 we'll take you live to the kansas statehouse for an address by the state's governor, sam brownback. that'll get underway at 7:30 eastern. >> he had been talking about this dream that he had had. he had talked about it for years, you know? the american dream. and that had become his dream. and he had been in detroit just a few months before, and he had talked about, you know, i have a dream that america will someday realize these principles in the deck decla
a summary what you have so far. >> yes, thank you, john. i would like to thank the organizers for being here. first visited fukushima in july of 2011 shortly after the disaster. and we spent about six weeks there since that time monitoring the movement of the contaminants and looking at the effect on the biological community. everything we have learned is new. it there's never been an event quite like this. there was twenty six years and we worked on that but the fukushima event and luckily was smaller, at least on the terrestrial side. we're thankful that are if that. the sorts things we've been looking at how are the insects, birds, microbes effected. are there measurable containment. and, you know, the first sets of results for preliminary published. we had a couple of paper published related to biodiversity as well as the major insect groups. the most striking thing to come from it is the level of variation among different groups. birds and butterflies, for instance, showed very strong and rapid responses to the contaminant, which we have seen. but many of the other insect groups, for in
. they are somewhat different. my publisher, john hanson, who is right here and his wife jody who is out here. here in the united states, they do wonderful things, wonderful creative publishing especially in a world where nobody reads anymore or very few do but you do so i am glad you are here tonight. after it came out in spain, in spanish, the university of balenciaga came out and told the first comma here to stay. it changes a bunch of stuff. lot of stuff it change was john's idea. and he was absolutely right. this chapter here i don't think anyone will understand it and also made some wonderful suggestions and so we took a chapter out and i put in an afterword, what would like to get out of diplomatic service and ando cf1 o get out of diplomatic service and and go to rutgers university where i have been ever since as a professor in the 60s or 70s where i went in 69 and i am still there and i was supposed to go to vietnam as a u.s. cultural attache from vietnam and i fought the war was a stupid idea and i had three little children and didn't want to abandon them to a war i di id't believe in. i
. john was really crazy. >> we will was pilot light? >> pilot, oh god. it was the dress i could not take. i also think going back to the original topic, of our free to mention interesting how the genre's cross. years ago sitting with two friends of mine we read some seminar and austria having lunch , so what are you working on now, my dear. she said, oh, i'm writing my memoirs. he said, at last you're turning your hand to fiction. [laughter] i mentioned earlier, i was friends with as a a berlin who wrote a great essay on tall store which influenced me hugely called hedgehog. the hedgehog has one big area. the fox has many ideas. i'm a fox. but as a fox we always love the other, and i'm in love with hedge talks. i only write about monsters and head towards. jesus is a bitch hag -- bighead charred. the only has one idea. we know what that was. tolstoy, he was the ultimate hedgehog. faust was i had charred. remember, i made a joke yesterday about when i wrote the novel about toast -- tolstoy a. please stop writing books about me? it seemed like a terrible joke. she was damned serious. i rea
were the people who most moved things? was it king, malcolm x was it stokely carmichael, was it john lewis. one of the ways i try to explain the students rosa parks made martin luther king possible the didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give up her seat on that montgomery bus, martin luther king would have been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. he opened up, she open the possibility for him to display the qualities that they had and to rise to the location. >> host: she also said as you know while she was sitting on the bus refusing to give up her seat she was thinking about the material of a new young black boy from chicago who went to mississippi and because he looked at a woman he was brutally murdered. do you think that his death changed or sparked anything in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. it was his death, it was the brown v. board of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior educati
for reelection. against john kerry, but voters by a small margin seen to believed bush would be the better leader. it cannot be said that the vote reflected a favorable referendum on george w. bush's first term. the importance of the communication skills of a candidate cannot be discounted as a factor, however. but all of this misses a different evaluation that merits being taken into account in judging between an income, barack obama, and his challenger, mitt romney. that is the chinks of the second term on too many presidents. 27 of 19 presidents -- only seven of 19 presidents elected to a second term avoid having a troubled or failed second term. that would give the country about a 30% chance of obama and the nation experiencing an improved security of economic climate. after four years if obama is reelected. i do not suggest that the gamble should not be taken. simply, that history into playing with politics might give us pause. so what does history predicted about a second term for barack obama lacks were he reelected with so few presidents having success at that time in office. what are the
is talk about a campaign that actually gets at the johns to talk to them about these are underage girls, this is not just sex, this is a crime. any sex with a girl under 18. and so i'm wondering whether or not you've been looking at, also, not only improving increasing the crimes against the people who are trafficking the girls, but also doing a public campaign sort of shaming people? be in our neighborhoods we've closed hotels down, but the neighbors are starting to take down the license plate numbers, and we're sending letters to the owners of these cars in these neighborhoods. we call it a dear john letter. [laughter] >> a dear john letter sounds like a really good with idea. >> that's my question. >> mayor mcginn, i don't know if you have anything you want to add to that, but i can tell you that we are trying to draw distinctions. prostitution is -- i don't consider it the oldest profession, i think politics is. [laughter] but it is a very old profession, and we're not specifically discussing that within the u.s. conference of mayors. we are, however, focusing on the human trafficki
back the ticket. i was 18 when i first read this and my younger brother john, 15, had just died a short three weeks after being diagnosed with acute leukemia. for me, ivan karimov had it right. in this fictional encounter, had more influence on my life and all the condolences and family support and help in the world. i loved reading the brothers karimov of and found myself looking for help in everything i read. and mike braun ski in an actor read enough for his double may care attitude for paying bills. brodsky throws the ball in aid for and sits down to pay them three times a year. i learned the telephone company did not appreciate this point of view. still, with or without the bill paying, braunski's life was more vivid than mine and more vivid than the lives of my friends and he seemed as real as any character in a biography. so it was with book after book. i fell in love with small boats and sailing through swallows and amazons. my friends and i learned from caulfield in the catcher in the rye and of course there was poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliott's f
first read this and my younger brother john had just died a short three weeks after being diagnosed with acute leukemia. for me then he had it right. and this fictional encounter had more influence on my life than all the condolences and families of port in the world. i loved reading it and i quickly found myself a king for help in everything i read. i like ron scanned anna karenina for his devil may care attitude towards paying bills. he throws them all in a drawer and he sits down to pay them three times a year. i learned that the telephone company did not appreciate his point of view. still, with or without the bill paid brodsky's life is more vivid than mine and more vivid than the lives of my friends. and he seemed as real as any character in a biography. and so it was with the book. i fell in love with small boats and sailing through swallows and amazons. my friends and i learned cool from holden caulfield and the catcher in the rye and of course there is poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliott's four quartets. and the learned attitude from yates and fro
to it that there are a number of civic minded things we will be able to do if we are lucky enough to have excess funds. >> john with cnn. whoever can address this. how many law enforcement agencies and officers will be involved in security on the day of the inoculation and also how large of an area will be closed off the street closures? >> first i want to apologize for saying there was more than one -- this afternoon but to answer your question we cannot go into detail as far as how many law-enforcement officers will be present for the end i duration and could you repeat your second question form a? [inaudible] >> how much of the area will be closed off? >> we have road closures in effect and i can touch base with you afterwards to provide that. [inaudible] >> with all events that happen on the capital complex we trying constantly to address them. as far specific threats, i can answer that right now but just know that myself -- though not by self, than the united states capital capital place with our law enforcement officers have been trained to address any issues that may come. >> to logistical questions. on
things like john, when i open my locker this morning, three lockers down, 47, there is a handler that guns sticking out. john, don't say anything, but there's a drug deal didn't go down in the back of the gym today. john, there's going to be a rumble. here's that were going to do. we think, we believe school resource officers can play an important role, but you should have significantly more flexibility in how to use them. that's why proposing a new school safety program that funds officers, but also tastier communities the flexibility to apply for other support. so the school resource officer is going to cost two x thousands of dollars a year with the money the federal government is pretty not. you can say we'd rather have a school psychologist for my school resource officer who was unarmed. but what we don't want, the president and i., we don't want to rent a cops in schools armed. we don't want people in schools who are trained at police officers. we are not even insisting schools use police officers if they conclude they need a school psychiatrist versus a school resource off
from the deep south. ... >> well, thank you, 'em john, and good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. >> there were two bills at national review. and in the conservative movement, two bills. bill buckley, a brilliant shooting star who lit up the sky, and bill rusher, a never-wavering north star by which conservatives learn today chart their -- learned to chart their political course. many have written about william f. buckley jr., that irresistible renaissance man, but no one until david frisk has given us an in-depth portrait of the other bill, william a. rusher, who among his other salutary contributions played a pivotal role in the life of the national draft goldwater committee. and that was critical. because if there had been no draft goldwater committee, there would have been no presidential candidate barry goldwater in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater, you see, who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight
person in the staff, they read a book called "rising tide," help me with the author? >> john berry. >> john berry. it is the history of how the mississippi river was changed to accommodate navigation and the impacts of the flood creating the conditions that we actually saw during hurricane katrina, but i highly recommend that. from our learnings in the gulf, what would you do to help develop resiliency in low income and rural communities that we know face disasters, especially in regards to the potential for hydrofracking? >> yeah. has not been asked a hard question yet. [laughter] >> that's a very good question. what i say we learned from the gulf and from similar disasters around the world is that it's really with social impact, fear about the chemicals or a whole series of different things that are fixable if we can improve our communication skills, our knowledge, and our willingness to share and tell the truth. to me, one of the most telling problems that came out of the gulf was was dispercent. how many of you heard of that? nearly everybody raises their hand. if i ask that on
. >> mayor john cook from el paso. from the panel, how important is it to present reform in his state of the city redress? >> it's extremely important. as i mentioned the opening, and, it has to be opened up and placed on track to not everybody knows in the united states of america, everybody today named, they have to know at the time has come to address the very serious issue and also tell the real story and the positive impact we have. we know that when you talk about billions of dollars being generated, hard-working people, people willing to do any type of job to support families, people want to work hard to support their case said they become engineers, scientists, this is the time. i think it has to be perhaps carved in a positive way, saying this is the right thing. it's absolutely important for president obama. it's the right time to make those comments. >> mayor, occasionally a nice, good policy and good politics come together in the right time and that's exactly what's going on with immigration reform. it's been a very public policy for a long time. now the politics seem to b
, clues in john conway's game of life, clues in the new kind of science and clues in those darn six monkeys at six typewriters getting it wrong. the stories of all these are in the god problem. the god problem sets out to solve the puzzle. clue number one, the first of the clues we'll dive into tonight comes from an obscure mathematician naped giuseppe piano. for that clue, let's get back to the clue that really counts the most: you. flash forward eight years. it's 1961. a dozen freshmen sit around a broad conference table in portland, oregon. you are one of them. statistics say that yours is the brightest class of college students in the country. your class' median scholastic aptitude tests are higher than those at the entering classes at harvard, mit or cal tech. yet what is about to come is a shock, a shock and an almost impossible challenge. you can smell your professor coming down the hall before you can see her. why? in the professor's hand is a stack of sheets of paper that exude the sweet smell of the chemicals used to make copy in a now-forgotten technology. the professor e
. c-span: when you sat down and wrote what you wrote about john chancellor, did you ever sit there and say, "take that. you just got what you deserve?" >> guest: no, i don't think that. as a matter of fact, you should see some of the stuff that i took out because i thought people would feel that way -- about any number of people where i thought, that sounds vindictive, don't do it. but it's a funny thing about writing -- and i'm sure you know it -- that you really don't sit there with a score list. you tell your story and you go from your memory and your notes and your research, but you really don't recreate, i don't think, the anger. i didn't say, "okay, and now it's time to get john chancellor." it's what happened as i remembered it. c-span: what did happen? >> guest: well, he had a problem about women, obviously. i mean, that's shown up several times in his career. the most recent one was the university club vote in new york to admit women, and he reportedly voted against it. he had a lot of trouble with women's stories in those years, stories that were about the women's m
the capacity engaged for decision making. that's three aspects that we are familiar with. and john wesley powell said in the late 1800s, wow, don't develop the colorado system, you're going to overuse it. but you know what? we're there. it's been a hundred years, more than a hundred years, and the system has provided the water for the needs in which it was first designed. those needs have changed. tsa what we haven't realized -- that's what we haven't realized. these other hases are, n., adding up to the cost. the cost -- the benefits of recreation on lake powell are now equal to the benefits of hydropower on that system. so we have to keep in mind these cross-scale impacts, but also a map onto the capabilities of people to respond. the type of plans, the type of impacts. we put into place the taylor grazing act in 1934, one of the best things we ever did. the question is can they address the state we're in? >> i'd like to go down the panel, and i'd like for the rest of the panelists to give a minute on what you feel is the best plan of attack then in the coming years to deal with drought
. then-president john f. kennedy in 1961. george h. w. bush in 1989. lyndon johnson from 1965. president jimmy carter in 1977. he will wrap up the night at 11 p.m. eastern president george w. bush, 2001. starting tonight at 8 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> why did you write a book about your experience because it was an abortive period of history. i felt that the fdic's perspective should be brought to bear. have been some other accounts of the crisis i thought were not completely accurate. especially since what we did and what i did. so i thought it was important for historical record to present our perspective and also i think currently for people to understand that there were different policy choices, different policy options, disagreements. and that if we want to present this crisis, another crisis from happening again i've only felt that the public itself needed to be engaged more on financial reform, to educate themselves better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head o
-span2, attorney general eric holder and tsa administrator john pistole at the u.s. conference of mayors followed by mayors and homeland security officials discussing the u.s.-mexico border. later, another look at gun violence was chicago mayor rham emmanuel and former congressman oeven latourette. >> i do solemnly swear. [applause] >> this weekend that 57 presidential inauguration as president obama begins his second term sunday, the official swearing-in ceremony at the white house live shortly before noon eastern. your phone calls and a look back at the president's 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 a.m. eastern. monday, the public inaugural ceremony with the swearing in at noon eastern at the u.s. capitol and other inaugural festivities including the capitol luncheon in the afternoon parade live all day coverage beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time on c-span , c-span radio and c-span.org and throughout the day join the conversation by phone, facebook and on twitter. >> and throughout inauguration day our website has additional features including video feeds from our c-span crews, video on
but i do not even recognize what they were asking. but to paraphrase john russell the usually knew what i didn't know. this exam looked more greek than usual for i flipped through the pages than surrendered. i walked to the front of the classroom where my calculus teacher and originally it said we will call her carol miller because that is her name carol smith was prop during the exam. i said i do not recognize the stuff on this exam. we had a contentious relationship suffice it to say she did not like me either. i can now admit i use my limited powers and a student association president to live schedule allston assembly so her class would be canceled. we did have flowers delivered to mrs. smith from a secret admirer just so we could see what would happen. and yes i did stop doing any homework cattle once i got into college. so i said the material to not look familiar she was not sympathetic. charles she said loudly, the of basing their rows of desks, if you had steadied, and the material would look a lot more familiar. it was a compelling point*. in a few minutes, a bright and, a bette
: john in stillwell, oklahoma, thank you for holing. you're on the air. >> caller: thank you. i have a question about your mother, i'm curious. you said that her personality change, when she went from one environment to another, what environment was the environment she was going to that caused the permit change? do you think that it was a culture thing from that environment? if so, can you elaborate more on the culture that she had -- that had changed her personality and what you think needs to be done? >> guest: yeah, you know, well, what happened was that when my father came here to the united states, my mother was left with us back in mexico, and she had to suffer, you know, the way a lot of wives suffer when they see their husbands go to another country, and there was a fear of being forgotten, abandoned, him finding another woman while he's gone. this was a fear that my mother had every single day about my father finding himself another woman here in the u.s., and forgetting about us and about her so she had to deal with this every single day, and when my father sent for her, it
that before? >> guest: some of them you have heard. one of them's the case of john and judy selling bunnies in a little town in missouri. they were fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, you can pay on our web site $90,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days you'll owe us $3.1 million. this is the kind of stuff that your government's doing to bully people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they're doing the same with confiscating people's land and saying you can't build on it because it's a wetland even though there is no water or stream or pond on the land. >> host: so as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> guest: we've looked at some of these things, and we've now constructed legislation to try to fix them. so like on the wetlands we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into navigable waters. i don't have any problem with that. but your backyard is not a navigable water, and dirt is not a blew tax. so we try to -- pollutant. so we try to redefine the clean water act to make sure we're not putting people in prison for putt
and i wish to heck that he would run for president. i know perhaps you would need a face john so you would look pretty like these other characters -- >> guest: i love that backhanded compliment. >> caller: but i am serious you are one of the few that really run the place crackly and actually there should be extracts from this in depth interview and you should settle the other senators and congressmen down and make them watch this because it's really terrific stuff. having said that, i have two things. you're latest book the debt bomb you talk about the career in congress and people who understand already what's going on and say he said it but the people that do not understand what's going on do not get it and what you are infering is that people take campaign contributions for changing the tax code, which they do and it's the only reason for having a corporate tax or any business tax because the customer pays it anyhow. but when you got to what your proposal was coming u.s. abandoned what you articulately champion on c-span and will solve so many of these problems. why did you give u
picture taken alongside of john f. kennedy. he is so proud. he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. by the age of 17 he is planning to be elected at turner -- eternal jenrry -- attorney general. this is something that everyone knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes the office candidate for the rhodes fellowship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother are the beauty queens who are flirtatious and attractive. that is really where his eyes have been. until he comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary them. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org.
for reelection. against john kerry, but voted by a small margin seem to believe bush should be the better theater cannot be with the vote reflected a favorable referendum on george w. bush's first term. the importance of the communication of a candidate cannot be discounted as a factor however. but all of this misses a different valuation of mayors being taken into account in judging between incumbent or obama and his challenger, and that rummy. that is the of the second term on so many presidents. only seven of 19 presidents elected to a second term avoided having a troubled or failed second term. i would give the country about a 30% chance of obama and the nation next. cnn improved security and economic climate. after four years if obama is reelected. i do not suggest the campbell should not be taken, simply that history playing with politics might give us pause. so what does history project about a second term for barack obama? where he reelect it was so few president having success at that time in office. what are the challenges that face those who had trouble or failed second term and what a
the capacity engaged for decision-making. that is three aspects that we are familiar with. john powell said in the late 1800's, if you're going to develop the colorado system you're going to overuse it. it. but do you know what? we are there. it's been more than 100 years and the system is provided the water for the need in which it was designed. those needs have changed. that is what we haven't realized. the other losses are in fact adding up to the cost. the benefits of recreation in late powell are now equal to the benefits of hydropower. so we have to keep in mind these costs scale impacts but also a map onto the capabilities of people to respond. type of plan, the impacts we put in place like the grazing act of 1934 was the best thing. their there are histories of good intervention. the question is can we address them? >> we have three more minutes so what i would like to go is go down the panel and i would like for the rest of the panel to give a minute on what you feel is the best plan of attack them in the coming years to deal with this drought and drought mitigation and its impact
? was a stokely carmichael or john lewis? >> guest: all of them have different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain to students that parks made martin luther king possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give seat on that montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate well meaning baptist minister. is because of rosa parks that we are talking about him today. he opened up -- she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had and to rise to the occasion. >> host: she also said as you well know that while she was sitting on the bus refusing to give seat she was thinking about emmett till, the young 14-year-old but what from chicago who went to mississippi in 1955 and because he looked at a white woman he was brutally murdered. do you think that changed or sparked anything in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. there was his death. there was the brown versus board of education decision. there was the killing of the civil rights workers. it was people like barbara jones, the young high school student
the movement and snic and others. who were the people that moved the most? king comment now, x, john lewis, stokely carmichael? >> all of the above. i tried to explain to students rosa parks made more to mr. king possible. not vice versa. if she did not do what she had done margin mr. king would be inarticulate well-meaning baptist minister. because of rosa parks we talk about him today. she opened up the possibility to open those qualities to rise to the equation. >> host: while she refused to give up her seat she was thinking of the 14 year-old black boy from chicago who went to mississippi because he whistled at a white woman was brutally murdered. to that change your spark anything with the civil rights movement? >> his death, brown vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember
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